Category Archives: NLRA

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NLRB finds policy against certain “verbal comments or physical gestures” may restrict concerted activity.

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has ordered a non-unionized hospital to rescind Code of Conduct provisions prohibiting “Verbal comments or physical gestures directed at others that exceed the bounds of fair criticism” and “Behavior . . . that is counter to promoting teamwork,” finding those prohibitions to be unfair labor practices. William Beaumont Hospital … Continue Reading

Issue: Blanket prohibition on “message” clothing violates the NLRA.

A car dealership’s prohibition on “pins, insignias, or other message clothing which are not provided to them by the company” was deemed overly restrictive and a violation of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Boch Imports, Inc., NLRB, Case No. 1-CA-83551, January 13, 2014. Beginning in December 2011, Boch Imports, Inc., doing business as Boch … Continue Reading

Fourth Circuit joins D.C. Circuit in striking down the NLRB’s embattled Notification of Employee Rights

The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has affirmed an April 2012 decision of the U.S. District Court for the District of South Carolina (Chamber of Commerce v. NLRB, D.S.C., No. 11-cv-2516, 4/13/12), striking down the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) controversial notice posting rule. The rule would have required most U.S private-sector employers — … Continue Reading

Expression of “personal contempt” in Facebook group message did not constitute protected concerted activity.

By now, most employers are aware of a number of “Facebook Firing” cases, in which individuals who were fired for Facebook postings have been reinstated after the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) found the postings to have been “protected concerted activity” under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). However, on May 8, 2013, an NLRB … Continue Reading

D.C. Circuit holds recess appointments to NLRB invalid.

On January 25, 2013, a three-member panel of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals issued a decision in finding that the recess appointments to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB or Board) by President Obama on January 4, 2012 were unconstitutional. Noel Canning v. NLRB, No. 12-1115, D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals (January 25, 2013). … Continue Reading

Termination for Facebook posting does not violate state invasion of privacy law.

Recent court decisions related to employees’ online postings have centered on whether disciplinary decisions regarding those postings may violate the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). The NLRA protects certain employee “concerted activities” aimed at discussing or improving working conditions, and precludes interference with such communications, including online messages. However, individuals also have brought other legal … Continue Reading

NLRB provides further direction on social media policies in recent advice memorandum.

Last month, employers received a little more help from the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) in formulating social media policies that pass muster under scrutiny from the Board. On October 19, 2012, the Associate General Counsel (AGC) for the NLRB’s Division of Advice provided a useful and well organized opinion in response to a request from … Continue Reading

NLRB is finding ways to implement its Employee Rights Notice posting, in spite of legal challenges.

On September 28, 2012, a three-member panel of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) affirmed the decision of an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) who upheld a car dealership’s firing of a salesperson that was based on a Facebook posting. But it also found a way to include its Notice of Employee Rights poster in the … Continue Reading

Definition of “concerted activity” continues to be construed broadly by the NLRB.

Recently, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has issued a number of decisions restricting the ways in which employers can limit employee electronic communications, even when those communications may damage the company or another employee’s reputation.  For many employers, those decisions have caused serious consternation, as companies now focus on what can and cannot be … Continue Reading

Employers must be able to recognize a Weingarten request in order to avoid liability under the NLRA.

Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) makes it illegal for an employer to interfere with or restrain employees from exercising the rights accorded to them under that Act. In NLRB v. J. Weingarten, 420 U.S. 251 (1975), the U.S. Supreme Court held that the NLRA “guarantees an employee’s right to the presence … Continue Reading

Violation of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) leads to serious penalties.

Discipline imposed pursuant to a company policy that restricts employees from any discussions of their wage rates may implicate Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Section 7 protects the right of employees to engage in “concerted activities” with each other for the purpose of collective bargaining or in efforts to improve working … Continue Reading

NLRB turns its attention to the elements of an acceptable Social Media Policy.

Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) protects the right of employees to engage in “concerted activities” with each other for the purpose of collective bargaining or in efforts to improve working conditions and terms of employment. These concerted activities can be done in person, or by other methods of communication, including electronic … Continue Reading

To post, or not to post . . . ? A recent decision may again delay the effective date for the required Notification of Employee Rights.

Unless reversed or stayed before the end of the month, an April 13, 2012 ruling by a federal district court in South Carolina will block the implementation of a National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) rule that would require most U.S private-sector employers — including most of the 6 million small business in the U.S. — … Continue Reading

NLRB’s power to impose penalties for employer’s failure to post “Employee Rights Notice” is clarified by the D.C. Circuit.

On March 2, 2012, a federal trial judge in the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals issued a highly-anticipated ruling on the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) controversial notice posting rule. National Association of Manufacturers v. NLRB, No. 11-1629 (ABJ), U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia (March 2, 2012). As most employers now are … Continue Reading

Further update on the NLRB’s “Employee Rights Notice” – another extension of the posting deadline.

As most employers now are aware, on August 25, 2011, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) announced its final rule related to the Notification of Employee Rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Under that rule, private-sector employers whose workplaces fall under NLRA jurisdiction will be required to post a notice of employee rights … Continue Reading

Hold onto that “Employee Rights Notice” – the NLRB has postponed the posting deadline.

On August 25, 2011, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) announced its final rule related to the Notification of Employee Rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Under the rule, private-sector employers whose workplaces fall under NLRA jurisdiction will be required to post a notice of employee rights under that Act. The final rule … Continue Reading

NLRB rule requires employers to post notice regarding employee rights to unionize.

On August 25, 2011, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a press release in which it announced its final rule related to the Notification of Employee Rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).  Private-sector employers (including labor organizations) whose workplaces fall under the jurisdiction of the NLRA will be required to post a … Continue Reading

The NLRB takes its Internet battle to a non-unionized workplace.

On May 9, 2011, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a complaint alleging that Hispanics United, a Buffalo non-profit that provides social services to low-income clients, violated the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) when it fired five employees after they used Facebook to criticize working conditions. This complaint comes on the heels of two … Continue Reading

Employee’s post-termination blog postings do not preclude reinstatement.

Last month, employers’ attention was focused on the settlement of a matter in which the NLRB originally had announced plans to prosecute a complaint brought by its Connecticut regional office regarding the termination of a union member/employee who had posted negative remarks about her supervisor and her employer on her personal Facebook page. The employee … Continue Reading

NLRB complaint based upon Facebook posts as “concerted activity” is settled prior to hearing.

In November 2010, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) announced its plans to prosecute a complaint issued by a Connecticut regional office regarding the termination of a union member/employee who posted negative remarks about her supervisor on her personal Facebook page. The complaint alleged that the employer, an ambulance service, maintained and enforced overly broad … Continue Reading

Supervisor has a viable claim under the NLRA when terminated or disciplined for refusing to commit unfair labor practices.

Although supervisors generally are not covered by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), which protects “employees” from unfair labor practices, that Act is deemed to have been violated if a supervisor’s discharge results from his refusal to commit an unfair labor practice. Recently, the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the dismissal of a … Continue Reading
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