Government contractors and subcontractors have one more thing of which to be aware when it comes to accommodating disabled individuals. The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP), part of the U.S. Department of Labor, has created a new “Requesting a Reasonable Accommodation” pocket card.

According to the OFCCP’s official announcement, the card “helps

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has determined that an employee’s reaction to stress that included threats to kill co-workers – made in “chilling detail and on multiple occasions” – meant that the individual could not perform an essential function of his job and, therefore, was not a “qualified individual” for protection under

This post was written by Ogletree Deakins attorneys, Jeanne E. Floyd (Of Counsel, Richmond Office), and Ruth Anne Collins Michels (Shareholder, Atlanta Office), and was published originally on the firm’s website on April 21, 2015.

For some time, employers have faced uncertainty about the status of their wellness programs under the Americans with Disabilities Act

An employee fired after asking to be reassigned to a role with less direct personal interaction as an accommodation for her “social anxiety disorder” is being allowed by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to take her case to a jury. Jacobs v. N.C. Administrative Office of the Courts, 4th Circ., No.

To establish a claim of “associational discrimination” under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), a plaintiff must demonstrate that she was discriminated against by her employer because of her relationship with a disabled person.

To substantiate a claim of associational discrimination under the ADA, an employee must establish each of the following key

A diabetic employee who quit her job in response to the employer’s rejection of her suggested “reasonable accommodation” cannot support claims under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), because she failed to participate in the interactive process in good faith, according to the 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. EEOC v. Kohl’s Dep’t Stores, Inc.,

A policy allowing an individual to work from home does not vitiate the fact that punctuality and predictable attendance are essential functions of a position. According to the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, an employee’s ongoing tardiness – although numerous modifications had been made to her schedule and workload to allow flexibility in

Job restructuring is one of the accommodations that an employer must consider under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its regulations. Recently, the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals held that if a minor adjustment to the work duties of a few other nursing home employees would have enabled the home’s hairdresser to