Some employers operate under the assumption that “at-will” employment means that an employee does not have to be given any reason for termination of his or her employment. However, that theory may allow an employee to overcome an employer’s motion to dismiss a discrimination lawsuit, since in order to overcome such a motion, a plaintiff

Retaliation claims are asserted in nearly half of the charges received by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), according to its Chair, Jenny Yang, and now comprise the most frequently alleged basis of discrimination. On August 25, 2016, the EEOC issued its Enforcement Guidance on Retaliation and Related Issues. The guidance, which replaces the

Every “employer, employment agency, labor organization, and joint labor management committee controlling an apprenticeship or other training program” covered by Title VII, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), or the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act (GINA) must post notices describing the pertinent provisions of Title VII, ADA, or GINA. Such notices must be posted in

Long-standing and consistently applied policy, coupled with clear and objective documentation of the employer’s financial status form the basis of a decision by the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to uphold the dismissal of an employee’s age discrimination claim. Green v. Twp. Of Addison, 6th Cir., No. 14-1607, unpublished (May 27, 2015).

This post was written by Ogletree Deakins attorneys, Jeanne E. Floyd (Of Counsel, Richmond Office), and Ruth Anne Collins Michels (Shareholder, Atlanta Office), and was published originally on the firm’s website on April 21, 2015.

For some time, employers have faced uncertainty about the status of their wellness programs under the Americans with Disabilities Act